Postnatal

Month 7

 

Baby Steps: Growth & Development

More and more, your baby is able to sit without support and imitate speech sounds with his/her own distinctive babble. He/she may also be reaching for things with a sweeping motion. He/she's still trying to combine syllables into word-like sounds and may be lunging forward and crawling. Babies who are more advanced physically can stand while holding onto something, wave bye-bye and bang objects together.1

 

Thankfully, baby is starting to understand the meaning of the word, "no," although he/she's also able to express their anger more strongly too. He/she's getting more sociable, and enjoys interacting with others.2

 

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Doing Everything Right: Tips for New Moms

  • The quality of breast milk depends on the mother's diet, so if you're breast-feeding, you may want to take a multivitamin-mineral supplement. Talk to your doctor to be sure.

  • To make sure your house is safe for baby to explore, get down on her level to see what he/she might grab, such as dangling electrical cords, tablecloths, pull cords for window blinds, garbage cans, house plants and unsteady furniture. Either put them out of their reach or get rid of them entirely.3

 

 

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Postnatal

Month 8

 

Baby Steps: Growth & Development

You're now hearing your baby say those magic words, "mama" and "dada," although he/she might not yet be able to tell which one goes with who. He/she's beginning to crawl more and can pass toys and other objects from one hand to the other. About half of babies this age can stand while holding onto something, and many do a lot of pointing. A few can pull themselves up to standing, pick up things between the thumb and finger, and use gestures to indicate what they want.1

 

Some babies at this stage become shy or anxious with strangers, and cry out of frustration when they can't do something they want to do.2

 

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Doing Everything Right: Tips for New Moms

  • Your baby may be showing signs of separation anxiety by getting upset when you're out of sight. When you leave him/her, give them a hug and a kiss and tell them you'll be back. Try to not get upset if he/she cries; just stay calm and reassuring.

  • As baby starts crawling and pulling himself up, resist the urge to put him/her in a walker. A walker can be unsafe if he/she stands on it to get to something out of reach, and it can discourage the floor play he/she needs.3

  • Now that your baby is more mobile, you must put things that could be poisonous out of their reach. A tube of bright lipstick or a bottle of coated pills might look like candy to him/her, so stash your purse in the closet and lock up medications.4

  • You need all the energy you can get right now, so be careful not to get dehydrated, which can make you feel tired. Try to drink an eight-ounce glass of water, low-calorie or calorie-free beverages with each meal and between meals.5

 

 

 

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Postnatal

Month 9

 

Baby Steps: Growth & Development

At nine months, your baby is combining syllables to make sounds that almost sound like words. He/she can stand while holding onto something, and may be using her thumb and finger to pick things up. Some babies are on the move now, using furniture and other objects to slide along or "cruise." If your baby's more advanced, he/she may be able to play pat-a-cake and say "mama" and "dada" to the right parent.1

 

Your baby may start making more correct associations, such as looking at the right picture when an image is named, and imitating other people's gestures. He/she may also smile at and kiss his/her own image in the mirror. They like to make sure you're close by when he/she's playing, and they may be more sensitive to other children being around.2

 

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Doing Everything Right: Tips for New Moms

  • It's a delight to watch your baby's language skills develop and his/her personality start to take shape. He/she's taking in everything they hear, so talk to him/her the same way you talk to other people and avoid baby talk. Your baby still comprehends more from your tone than from your actual words, though. The more you talk to your baby — while preparing dinner, driving, or getting dressed — the more he learns about communication.3

  • You may be wondering if it's time to buy shoes for your baby since he/she's doing a lot more standing, cruising and even walking. Once he takes his first steps, it's time for real shoes with flexible, nonskid soles and a more substantial upper. He can still wear soft baby shoes or socks indoors to help build strength and coordination in his legs and feet.4

  • Excessive thirst, dry mouth, headache, fatigue and little or no urination can be signs of dehydration. To prevent it, try to drink at least eight, eight-ounce glasses a day; more when you're extra thirsty.5

 

 

 

 

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Fluoride & Your Child
Child Dehydration Facts
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