Postnatal

Month 10

 

Baby Steps: Growth & Development

Your baby is now crawling, "cruising" by walking while holding onto the furniture, or some combination of both. He/she can pick things up between his/her thumb and finger and wave goodbye. He/she may be getting better at calling "mama" and "dada" by the right names, and usually responds to his/her own name. They understand "no" and use gestures to indicate what he/she wants. A few babies may already be drinking from cups, standing alone for a few seconds at a time and putting toys and other objects into containers.

 

As baby's self-esteem starts to develop, you'll notice him/her responding to positive recognition such as clapping. Along with it come his/her moods, which can be sad, happy or angry. He/she might also start showing signs of fear, such as being cautious of heights or having separation anxiety.1  

 

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Doing Everything Right: Tips for New Moms

  • At this age, your baby can probably pick up small items with his/her thumb and forefinger, also known as the "pincer" grasp. Most everything will go in his/her mouth first, so be sure there's nothing lying around he/she could choke on. When it comes to food, don't let him/her have anything that won't dissolve in water, like a peanut.

  • Even if it feels silly, respond to your baby's chatter with adult language as though you understand his/her every word. This will help him/her learn how to pronounce words correctly and develop good speech patterns.2

  • You may want to add safety gates and corner protectors to your shopping list, now that your baby is cruising, crawling and starting to walk. The gates will help keep her away from stairways and rooms with fireplaces or other hazards, and the corner protectors will soften the furniture's sharp edges.3

 

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Postnatal

Month 11

 

Baby Steps: Growth & Development

It's hard to believe how much your baby has grown as you watch her standing alone for a few seconds, playing pat-a-cake and calling you "mama." He/she may be able to understand simple instructions now, and he/she can probably imitate some of your activities. Babies who are more developed have added a word or two to their vocabularies and can stoop down from a standing position.

 

Emotionally, your baby is trying to gain your approval and avoid disapproval. In spite of these good intentions, he/she can also be uncooperative.1

 

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Doing Everything Right: Tips for New Moms

  • Your baby's first birthday is coming, so test the camera to make sure it works and the battery is charged.

  • Even though most babies can handle common allergens, you should know the signs of an allergic or bad reaction to food. Vomiting, diarrhea, face or lip swelling, trouble breathing or hives that shows up within a few hours of eating could be a food-triggered response. Don't wait; call your doctor right away.2

  • A lot of moms stop breastfeeding after their babies' first birthdays. If that timing makes sense for you and your baby, you may want to start weaning him/her gradually now. Shorten your nursing times and try giving her a bottle or a snack instead.3

  • Getting your daily dose of drinking water can go a long way to regulate your body temperature and keep nutrients flowing to your organs.4 Bored with plain water? Try adding a little lemon or lime juice for a new twist.

 

 

 

 

 

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Postnatal

Month 12

 

Baby Steps: Growth & Development

You might want to watch what you do and say around your baby now, because he/she's not only imitating you, he/she's jabbering word-like sounds they hear. They use gestures to tell you what they want, and he/she may be able to understand and respond to simple instructions. A lot of babies this age are taking a few steps and learning new words. Some can scribble with crayons and walk fairly well.

 

Your baby's moods and emotions are becoming even more distinct, and he/she may have an occasional temper tantrum or fluctuate between being cooperative and uncooperative. The good news is that he/she's also developing a sense of humor. At this age, some babies tend to cling to their parents or to one parent in particular.1

 

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Doing Everything Right: Tips for New Moms

  • You may be eager to take your baby out into the world, but before you pack her up for a week's vacation, it might be a good idea to take a few practice runs. Take a short day or weekend trip to see how he/she does, then work your way up to a longer trip.2

  • By now, your baby should be making word-like sounds and using one or more words that he/she understands. If he/she isn't making any sounds or making eye contact with you, call your doctor.3

  • The Canadian Dental Association encourages the assessment of babies, by a dentist, within 6 months of the eruption of the first tooth or by one year of age.4

  • After your baby's first birthday, you can let him/her drink as much water as they want.

 

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Toddlers
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Fluoride & Your Child
Child Dehydration Facts
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